The Hunted: A Sequel

My first novel (which you can find on this blog) is in its first revision, and I HATE editing (writing, not video… I’m good at editing video). So as a means of catharsis, I’ve started working on the next book, which takes place about a month or two after the first story. If you’ve read the first book, you know it ended on quite a cliffhanger with our characters in an uncertain situation.

I’m happy to say that I’ve finished the first chapter of the sequel to the Department for Mutated Persons, The Hunted. When I’m a bit farther along I will probably post the first chapter for those of you whose curiosity is gnawing away at your bones.

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A little update

Photo Apr 15, 4 02 01 PMDo you remember when I wrote that book. Like… a WHOLE book. There were mutants and a work camp and some bad guys. Wasn’t it great?! What happened with that?

So life has been a little busy. I replaced writing time, with playtime. Instead of making words fit on a page, I’ve tried imparting them to a little human.

Being a dad has become such a life-defining role for me, but I haven’t forgotten about the book. I’ve started revising it slowly over the past couple months. That’s ‘dad’ code for: I’ve revised one of the chapters. But it is a damn good chapter now.

If you’re interested in helping me revise my book, you can email me. I’d love to get an extra pair of eyes on this thing, so it can be released into the wild as a genuine book. If you have any advice on publishing (self or otherwise), I’m always open to twitter conversations as well.

 

 

Our World Now

So we filled our cups to the brim with hatred. And we cast ignorance upon you if you didn’t agree. And with any misstep we wouldn’t bury you, but you felt six feet under. We’d take your job, your reputation, and – if an apology was granted – your soul as well. And you would be the cautionary tale that we would spin cycle in our 24 hour news coverage. And the pundits would bemoan your mistake, and assassinate your character, and impugn your very existence. Because we were right, and we always would be. And you would be wrong, and you would be evil, a relic of an ancient past full of pagan ritual and superstition.

Two Types

I was having a conversation with a co-worker the other day (see: an ambiguous approximation of time ago), when I was struck by something not-so profound, but (all the same) important.

When it comes to talking about our problems, you can see someone else in two different ways. You either see a person with a problem, or you see a problem with a person.

A Problem with a Person

The problem-first type see the problem before they see the person. They may even cut off the person explaining their problem in order to ‘fix it’ right away. If you are this type of person, you might face these types of issues in relationships.

You cut people off before you really understand the problem.

You are so excited to solve the problem, that you forget you are listening to a living, breathing person, and they aren’t finished speaking. Most problems are not as simple as we want them to be. They aren’t black and white.

Remind yourself: Slow down. Let them finish. Address the human element of the problem.

Your friend doesn’t really want their problem solved.

This is probably the hardest part of seeing the problem first (or only seeing the problem) because sometimes people just want to vent about their problems and hear that someone empathizes with them. But you don’t like this sentiment. There is a problem and it needs solving. The person will only feel better if you solve it for them. But here’s the deal: their problem is usually solvable by them. Many times someone knows what they have to do, and they’re just looking for a sympathetic ear to acknowledge their issue.

Remind yourself: Listen to them first. Offer sympathy. Ask if they’d like help.

A Person with a Problem

While acknowledging a person is the more important part of any relationship, this type of person can also create unhealthy frustrations. With a tendency to over-protect a person or a relationship, the person-first type won’t address the problem or will sugarcoat in such a way as to prove unhelpful or – worse than that – destructive to the other person or relationship. Here are just a couple of situations where the person-first type can cause damage.

Your friend truly needs a solution.

So many times a friend comes to you seeking a solution, but you only go as far as sympathy for their plight. You don’t address their problem, nor offer any help in finding the solution.

Remind yourself: There is a problem here. If you truly care about your friend, coworker, family member then you will offer help.

You worry about hurting their feelings.

Sometimes (most times) we bring problems on ourselves. Everybody makes mistakes, and sometimes we get stuck in problems because of it. The person-first type has a harder time telling harsh truth because they care about the person first and the solution second, and they don’t want to harm their relationship.

Remind yourself: Everybody makes mistakes. Understand your relationship with the other person. If you have the kind of relationship which allows you to tell them the truth, listen thoughtfully and tell them like it is. Don’t dilute the truth to protect a friendship because you will inevitably exacerbate their problem and could inevitably ruin the relationship anyway.


If you see yourself in either of these two types of people, acknowledge it and move forward. Bear in mind that there are others out there just like you, and you can use your techniques on them just fine! They will probably enjoy it!

Also, if you see someone else is behaving as the opposite type to who you are, cut them some slack. Either way, they probably like you and are doing the best they can to be helpful. If it’s becoming a problem in your relationship, have a conversation about these different types.

And finally, if you are having relationship issues (work, home or otherwise) look at the other person and see if you have conflicting styles. If you make the effort to match what they like, it can have a great effect. It may even open up a conversation to see how you both can serve each other better.